The Carpark, by Shyue Woon

IPA IPA Mentorship Program, IPA Workshops, PROJECTS 6 Comments

I don’t know what to make of my investigation, maybe this is how I interpret the carpark to be, a Purgatory, a space that is neither heaven nor hell.

Earlier this year during one of my counseling sessions, I was advised to keep a diary of my thoughts and reflections. A few weeks into the exercise, I realized my thoughts were better communicated in visual form than in writing or verbalization. Without the structural constraints of language, photography became a way for me to communicate with my inner-self, as it is more intuitive and open to interpretations. I feel ‘safer’ to share my images to outside world, while keeping my inner-self intact.

At some point, I found myself drawn to the mystery gloomed by a dark, confining multi-storey carpark. With a hint of fear, I ventured into the void. I soon traced unexplained evidence that led to unsolvable puzzles. I don’t know what to make of my investigation, maybe this is how I interpret the carpark to be, a Purgatory, a space that is neither heaven nor hell.

Photographs & Text: Shyue Woon | Website: http://shyuewoon.com

The Carpark, by Shyue Woon was made during the IPA Mentorship Program. Click to view: More Mentorship Projects.

The IPA Mentorship Program is a distance learning photography mentorship initiative by Invisible Photographer Asia (IPA) for those who wish to further their personal photographic vision and goals. More info: http://invisiblephotographer.asia/ipamentorship/


 

 

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  3. Fantastic images! They’re the kind that stays in your memory for a time, carefully navigating spaces of quiet existence and are at once evoking a sense of lingering presence and looming absence.

  4. An excellent series. I love the way a dark, brooding, and often disturbing sense of this place is communicated by working around its edges via details and surfaces. Really moving.

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