In a small homage to Myanmar and Chinese People On The Train, by Wang Fuchun, here is a glimpse of the people and stories at the Yangon Circular Railway.

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The Tiger landed. My eyes opened. Rangoon was waiting for dawn. A selection of street photographs taken in Myanmar’s largest city and former capital.

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A selection of photographic haikus taken at the first-ever IPA Street Photography Workshop in Yangon, Myanmar.

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The All Burma Students’ Democratic Front (ABSDF) is one of the last armed groups to sign a ceasefire agreement with the Myanmar government.

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I came across an abandoned police station and found identity photographs of the police personnel being scattered around. Most of them still look good, except for a layer of dust on the photographs.

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I never knew my Grandfather that well. I always had somewhat of an estranged relationship with him. My grandfather had two wives– and he would split his time between both sides of the family.

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In Haibo’s photographs titled ‘The Breath Of Nights’, he points his lens at the colourful night lives and euphoria of Shenzhen’s modern and progressive youth.

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“Dear Japanese” documents the offspring of Japanese soldiers and Indo women, born during Pacific War, now living in the Netherlands.

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My story centers around a man Mr. Sandip Karan who loves street dogs and his love knows no bounds, unlike most dog lovers.

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It has been a few months now since we launched IPA Labs, our new distance learning and collaboration initiative. We are now happy to introduce the IPA Mentorship Program.

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Born in 1971, Shinya Arimoto has been photographing and exhibiting work since 1994, and was awarded the 35th Taiyo Award in 1997. We speak with Arimoto about his work and experience.

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Myanmar is included in the list of 57 countries worldwide with the most critical shortage of medical personnel.

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